Easy Sourdough Stuffing (Low FODMAP, Lactose-Free)

an overhead shot of a dish of sourdough dressing next to a spoon and bowl of chopped parsley

Enjoy a classic holiday side dish without the tummy troubles with this Easy Sourdough Stuffing recipe! Incredibly delicious and a must-have side dish for any Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner table, this sourdough stuffing is low FODMAP as well as lactose-free. Please note: it is not gluten-free.

Hey, is that ‘real’ bread?!?!

I’ll admit that it’s a bit shocking for a Paleo blog to feature a recipe starring a grain-based, gluten-containing bread like sourdough. I thought about developing a stuffing recipe without bread. However, as stuffing / dressing is one of my favourite holiday side dishes, I just couldn’t bring myself to change it so drastically. A little bread every once in awhile on special occasions may not work for everyone, but it’s okay for me. While I may create a Paleo bread recipe that might work for stuffing someday, I haven’t yet, and I would like to eat stuffing at Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner before then.

a spoonful of sourdough stuffing taken from a baking dish next to bowls of chopped parsley and scallions

Low FODMAP Bread Options

Even though I write mostly Paleo recipes, I can tolerate and eat some gluten-free grains and a few commercially produced gluten-free products containing gluten-free grains. I started creating a stuffing recipe using store-bought gluten-free bread, but I haven’t found a low FODMAP gluten-free bread that I like locally. Plus, the gluten-free breads that I tested didn’t work the greatest for stuffing as they easily fall apart.

I’ve learned that gluten-free does not always equal low FODMAP as gluten is not a FODMAP; rather, the grains that contain gluten, such as wheat, barley and rye, are typically high in the FODMAP fructans. Consequently, the recommended portion sizes for bread containing wheat, barley and rye by Monash University are typically low, as in 1 slice per serving, but portion sizes vary from bread type to bread type.

Certain types of sourdough bread provide a different story. Briefly put, while still containing wheat and thereby fructans (and, of course, gluten), the traditional process used to create sourdough bread breaks down the FODMAP fructans found in wheat, allowing some people (not everyone) with IBS to better tolerate sourdough bread.

According to Monash Univerisity’s Low FODMAP Diet App, white wheat sourdough bread created using the traditional process is considered tolerable for most individuals with IBS in servings of up to 2 slices, or 109 grams. To test my tummy, I tried a few pieces of white wheat sourdough upfront and did okay, which is what led me to feature sourdough in this stuffing recipe, but everyone is different. If you have concerns about how your body might react to sourdough bread, talk to your doctor or dietitian before making this recipe.

overhead shot of a baking dish of sourdough dressing with a spoon next to a blue towel and bowls of chopped parsley and onions

Low FODMAP Bread Resources

The topic of low FODMAP bread is a complicated animal. As I am not a registered doctor or dietitian, I rely on information provided by such professionals to create my recipes. I’ve found the following resources on low FODMAP bread and sourdough bread to be helpful:

Can this be stuffed inside a turkey?

This sourdough stuffing recipe is not written to be stuffed into a turkey; rather, it is intended to be cooked outside of a turkey in a baking dish. Technically it should be named “Sourdough Dressing” but as most people call dressing “Stuffing,” I have used the term “Stuffing.”

According to a variety of different reputable health sources, the safest and most optimal way to cook Thanksgiving or Christmas stuffing is outside the bird in a baking dish. If you need that sense of it having been cooked inside the bird, I suggest serving it with turkey drippings or gravy drizzled on top.

a close up of sourdough stuffing in a baking dish with a spoon

Necessary Equipment

The equipment I used to make this Easy Sourdough Stuffing recipe includes:

  • Stove top and oven
  • 8″ x 11″ glass baking dish (2-quarts)
  • Large baking sheet
  • Large spatula
  • Extra large mixing bowl
  • Large skillet
  • Stirring spoon
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Ladle

How to Prepare Easy Sourdough Stuffing

Preheat and Toast

To start, I preheat my oven to 350° F and grease a 2-quart baking dish with ghee. While the oven is preheating, I chop up my white wheat sourdough bread into 1″ pieces. Than, I spread it evenly (more or less) on a large baking sheet. Once the oven is preheated, I put my baking sheet on the center oven rack and toast the bread for 20 minutes, flipping as best I can about halfway through using a large spatula. Once the bread is toasted, I remove the baking pan from the oven – leaving the oven on – and add it to an extra large mixing bowl.

I choose to toast the bread instead of letting it sit out to become stale. I’ve found this to be a more consistent way to get it stiff enough to be ideal for stuffing. If the bread is not stiff enough before you pour on the liquid, it will fall apart and become mush.

side angle of a spoonful of sourdough stuffing

Chop & Sauté

While the bread is toasting, I chop the celery and carrots. Then, I put a large skillet on medium heat and add 3 tbsp of garlic-infused olive oil. Once the skillet is hot, I add the celery and carrots and sauté for 3 minutes. Then, I stir in the dried herbs – thyme, sage and rosemary – and allow them to sauté for about 30 seconds until they become fragrant. I then stir in the ghee and stir until it is melted. Lastly, I pour in the chicken bone broth, add salt and pepper and stir until evenly mixed.

Mix & Drizzle

After the broth mixture is complete, I return to my bowl of bread and add the chopped scallions, tossing with my hands until more or less combined. Then, I drizzle the broth mixture from the skillet over the bread. I use a ladle to do this if pouring directly from the pan proves too difficult. Then, I gently stir the bread mixture until it is evenly covered in broth. Try to avoid squishing or ripping the bread while stirring.

close up of a spoonful of sourdough stuffing

Bake & Serve

Finally, I pour the coated bread into my greased baking dish and bake at 350°F for 35 minutes. The stuffing should be crispy and golden on the outside while remaining moist on the inside. I serve it at my Thanksgiving, Christmas or any holiday table with the low FODMAP option of my Instant Pot “Garlic” Mashed Potatoes (Paleo, Whole30, Low FODMAP Option) and Instant Pot Glazed Carrots (Paleo, Low FODMAP, Refined Sugar-Free).

overhead shot of sourdough stuffing next to a wooden spoon, with easy sourdough stuffing low fodmap lactose free at the top and goodnomshoney.com at the bottom
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a baking dish full of sourdough stuffing next to a spoon and bowl of chopped parsley

Easy Sourdough Stuffing (Low FODMAP, Lactose-Free)


  • Author: Gail
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 55 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Yield: 16 1x

Description

Enjoy a classic holiday side dish without the tummy troubles with this Easy Sourdough Stuffing recipe! Incredibly delicious and a must-have side dish for any Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner table, this Sourdough Stuffing is low FODMAP at one, 3/4-cup serving as well as lactose-free (but not gluten-free).


Ingredients

Scale
  • 16 oz (455 g) white wheat sourdough bread (about 9 cups)*
  • 3 tbsp garlic-infused olive oil
  • ½ cup ghee, plus more for greasing the baking dish
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced (about 1 cup)**
  • 2 medium carrots, sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried sage
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2 cups low FODMAP chicken bone broth
  • 1 cup scallions, green parts only, chopped
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped, for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F and grease a 2-quart baking dish (I use an 8”x 11” glass baking dish) with ghee. Chop bread into 1” pieces and spread evenly on a baking sheet. Toast in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, flipping with a large spatula halfway through. Once toasted, place in an extra large mixing bowl and set aside to cool.
  2. While the bread is toasting, chop the carrots and celery. Then, set a large skillet on medium heat and add 3 tbsp of garlic infused olive oil. Once hot, add the celery and carrots and sauté for 3 minutes. Then, add the dried thyme, sage and rosemary and sauté for 30 seconds. Add ½ cup ghee and stir until melted. Finally, add the chicken broth, salt and pepper and stir until combined.
  3. Remove skillet from heat. Add scallions to the bowl with the bread pieces and toss until combined. Drizzle broth mixture from the skillet (using a ladle if needed) onto the bread pieces and gently stir with a spoon until the bread is evenly coated.
  4. Add coated bread to a greased, 2-quart baking dish and bake at 350°F for 35 minutes. Remove from oven and serve with your favourite holiday dishes, such as my Instant Pot “Garlic” Mashed Potatoes (Paleo, Whole30, Low FODMAP Option) and Instant Pot Glazed Carrots (Paleo, Low FODMAP, Refined Sugar-Free).

Notes

Makes about 12 cups of stuffing, with one serving size at 3/4 cup (16 servings total). This recipe is written to be baked in a baking dish (it’s technically Sourdough Dressing), not stuffed inside a turkey.

*White wheat sourdough bread (which contains the FODMAP fructans) created using the traditional sourdough process is considered tolerable for most individuals with IBS in servings of up to 2 slices, or 109 grams. One 3/4 cup serving size of stuffing contains about 28 grams of sourdough, which is just above 1/4 of the tolerable amount. Be mindful of other dishes you consume alongside this sourdough stuffing containing the FODMAP fructans to avoid FODMAP stacking

**Celery, which contains the FODMAP mannitol, is considered tolerable for most individuals with IBS in servings of a 1/4 stalk, or 10 grams. One 3/4 cup serving of stuffing only about half of the listed tolerable amount of celery per serving. Be mindful of other dishes you consume alongside this sourdough stuffing containing the FODMAP mannitol to avoid FODMAP stacking.

FODMAP Data Source: Monash University’s Low FODMAP Diet App

  • Category: Side Dish
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: sourdough stuffing, sourdough dressing, thanksgiving stuffing, thanksgiving dressing, thanksgiving side dish recipes, christmas side dish recipes, holiday side dish recipes, side dish, low fodmap stuffing, low fodmap dressing, lactose-free

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